Colin D’Cruz: The Music of Goa

avatar Mark Fonseca Rendeiro
in Goa
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avatar Colin D\'Cruz
at Jazz Goa Studios
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in-the-jazz-goa-studio-with-colin-dcruz_31171317225_oJazz, konkani, Portuguese, bollywood; these are just the tip of the iceberg when you start to examine the rich heritage of Goan music.  Colin D’Cruz is a one stop shop for music made in Goa. As a musician, producer, and record label, he’s got his ear to the ground when it comes to what sounds are coming out of Goa; yesterday, today and in the future. We went to visit him in the studio where we recorded this brief tour of Goan music.

Songs used in this podcast (available via JazzGoa): 

  • Shubhangi Joshi – Kuch Na Kaho
  • Queenie Fernandes – Rupkar Tuzo
  • Nadia Dias – Cucurucu
  • Zezinho Fernandes – Eu Daria Minha Vida
  • Francis Lobo – Yours
  • Seby Ef – Eke Raatcho Mog
  • Joshua Costa – Bachata Blues

 

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Amin Sheikh: Growing Up Mumbai

avatar Mark Fonseca Rendeiro
In Mumbai, India
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avatar Amin Sheikh
at the Bombay to Barcelona Café
Guest

30823250901_0908e4f63e_b(Episode 488) Amin Sheikh grew up living on the streets of Mumbai, with all the horror and joy that only they can bring to a child with no one to turn to. Those streets might have eaten him alive, and they almost did- until someone came along and changed all that. A few someones in fact, who’s actions changed the direction of his life. His personal slogan, “I am because of you”, means exactly what it sounds like. If you’re reading this, listening to this, sharing in this experience, then he is in many ways – because of you.

We sat in his Mumbai cafe-library, “From Bombay to Barcelona”, in a state of euphoria enjoying delicious food and drink. But what really makes everything taste better is getting to sit in the presence of such a passionate and loving human being. Today on the podcast, the story of Amin Sheikh, in his own words.

This podcast is part of the “South of Mumbai” series, stories from India being recorded and produced all month on the road. If you’re enjoying, click here to show what its worth to you and help us pay for the planes, trains, autorickshaws, buses, dosas, paneers, lassi’s and massala chai’s. Seriously, for a small amount you help ensure we have chai to help keep us going.

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Break Down: The Struggle For Responsible Ship Recycling

avatar Mark Fonseca Rendeiro
in Amsterdam, NL
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avatar Patrizia Heidegger
in Brussels, BE
Guest
avatar Ingvild Jenssen
in Brussels, BE
Guest

(Show #487) While global shipping is a massive and lucrative business that benefits people in so many ways, there is another side to it. Once the massive vessels need to be retired, they have to be broken down and their valueable materials recycled. Doing this using well equipped workers and proper facilities comes at a cost, and for decades, companies have been getting around that cost by sending their ships to parts of the world like India and Bangladesh where neither equipment nor proper facilities are required. Where no one is looking, and where toxic materials can be dumped and handled with minimal complaints. My guests on today’s program from the Brussels based NGO ShipBreaking Platform are among the most well informed and dedicated observers of this practice, advocated to stop harmful practices and push companies to act responsibily. A major challenge in an industry few people follow or feel able to influence, listen in and hear what is going on out there.

Oil Drums in Karachi, photo by  Michael Foley / Flickr CC-BY-ND 2.0
Rust – photo by Michael Foley / Flickr CC-BY-ND 2.0

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Choosing Silence

This website started as a blog in 2002. Back then it was the early days of sharing, personal diaries online, leaving and responding to comments; ongoing conversations. All these years later, after the dawn of podcasting and youtube stars, social media and viral content, live tweeting and instagraming- things evolved from a very exciting and seemingly limitless new world for communication and understanding, to a fickle world of hearing only what interests you and tuning out everyone and everything else. The world got smaller, while also becoming a place we don’t trust or yearn for. People could communicate with everyone and anyone, but usually end up posting a few photos of a baby, a pet, or a something temporarily amusing. Long story short: it is not quite the world it looked like it might become in those early days of personal publishing and new tools for expression. It has become.. something else.

But you’ve heard much of this. One thing there is no shortage of on today’s internet- commentary about the state of the internet. This alone has, over there years, inspired me to stop writing. In a world where everyone is expressing themselves, everyone is sharing, everyone is looking into their technology in search of — something, we don’t know what- my gut reaction is to close the browser and forget about writing words on a screen. What’s the difference, won’t it all be scrolled out of relevance really soon anyway? Lately, I’ve found more joy in the comfort of my home, sharing a good meal or laugh with my partner, gathering with friends as often as possible in person, than I have toiling over what to write in the next paragraph.

I’m somehow reminded of the old Timothy Leary (via Marshall McLuhan) quote: “Turn on, tune in, drop out”, though I’m sure like many recycled quotes, I may not completely understand the themes of self-reliance and consciousness that I think he was recommending back in the 60’s. But if he meant in any way looking inward for meaning and solutions to problems, then that is very much we’re I’ve been over the past few years. Not looking to any institution, leader, or movement of any kind… I’ve sought the answer within. And that journey continues, but it is nice to write on the blog like old times, regardless if anyone is reading.

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