Break Down: The Struggle For Responsible Ship Recycling

by bicyclemark
Break Down: The Struggle For Responsible Ship Recycling
Oil Drums in Karachi, photo by <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/michaelfoleyphotography/2547842587/in/photolist-4T9mQt-4wFCML-qWrx4r-m4gqJq-8yMZQM-4yzi2Z-4BXh44-7vMcKb-fAaYES-Con6Ca-6kiJTV-4HgTVd-pGsMwo-ssa9Tp-5BjgFW-8p4t2K-dtcx4a-oKKBZ9-vY5csj-a4i4ny-sHC6yq-fHxDX-fHzDG-BmHcD8-b4CT2B-drU5uo-4Sypsz-6kiPje-7W9z7M-fioTXk-pUTaZT-cRH1RJ-rkq88P-a8mJAd-cj7hrN-9RhyxS-otDYEv-6t3Eep-4SCCs1-bN496n-6P6zts-5rPWSj-8ZdvJK-gnbu7i-99XZCF-bPrVsP-pps71f-6WMCzY-79S2z7-ajeQsN"> Michael Foley / Flickr CC-BY-ND 2.0</a>

(Show #487) While global shipping is a massive and lucrative business that benefits people in so many ways, there is another side to it. Once the massive vessels need to be retired, they have to be broken down and their valueable materials recycled. Doing this using well equipped workers and proper facilities comes at a cost, and for decades, companies have been getting around that cost by sending their ships to parts of the world like India and Bangladesh where neither equipment nor proper facilities are required. Where no one is looking, and where toxic materials can be dumped and handled with minimal complaints. My guests on today’s program from the Brussels based NGO ShipBreaking Platform are among the most well informed and dedicated observers of this practice, advocated to stop harmful practices and push companies to act responsibily. A major challenge in an industry few people follow or feel able to influence, listen in and hear what is going on out there.

Additional Link: