ctrp350 Eid and Homosexuality in Afghanistan

Alleys of KabulOn the eve of Eid a large group of friends made their way to an oasis outside Kabul to have a relaxing dinner. Sure enough I brought my recorder and before you know it, we got into discussions about the importance of the holiday and eventually, the history of homosexuality in Afghanistan. This recording was made during the course of our dinner and as such drifts off and is interrupted occasionally. Both topics could surely be developed further, but at the very least, this podcast might provide a good introduction.

Flattr this!

5 thoughts on “ctrp350 Eid and Homosexuality in Afghanistan

  • September 16, 2010 at 6:31 pm
    Permalink

    That was very illuminating.

  • September 18, 2010 at 3:21 am
    Permalink

    What I found most interesting is that despite you repeatedly trying to steer the conversation to the idea of a same-sex loving, maybe married, couple, your guests kept talking about homosexuals in terms of the sex act and, more disturbingly, sexual violence (pedophilia, rape, prostitution).

    • September 18, 2010 at 4:19 pm
      Permalink

      yeah at some point i realized we were not going to be on the same wavelength but I figured it was still interesting. But definitely dont like what may be a very widespread way of thinking here that 1 is connected to the other. 🙁

  • September 19, 2010 at 4:04 pm
    Permalink

    Amazing material Mark,
    As said in comment above, its quite interesting to see the context shifting…

    As I listen to your podcast, I often locate it on google earth. Im my search, Ive found this location, that potentially might help you to expand subject of homosexualism there…

    (Gay Travel Advisory)
    http://bbs.keyhole.com/ubb/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=884694

    http://maps.google.com/maps?t=h&hl=en&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=Ireland&ll=34.528719,69.173143&spn=0.001003,0.001725&z=19

  • September 20, 2010 at 4:45 pm
    Permalink

    not only the situation of homosexuals, lesbians and the like, but also the drug addicts, disabled, elderly and the Afghan society sees

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: