bm234 Kasparov and The Other Russia

Gary Kasparov is known for being a chess master. Now he is challenging the president of Russia for control of the country, calling it a battle to bring democracy back to the nation.  With the help of my guest, Olaf Koens, in Moscow, we look at the details of Kasparov that you may have not known, and beyond that.. the parties that are challenging the Putin backed campaign in the next Russian election. We Discuss:

  • – Who is Kasparov?
  • – His contreversial chess moves
  • – His politics
  • – Other parties aligned or not aligned with him
  • – The threshold
  • – The crazy writer
  • – The Putin candidates
  • – The communist party
  • – The likely outcome
  • – Apathy in Russia, Apathy in Europe

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4 thoughts on “bm234 Kasparov and The Other Russia

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  • November 15, 2007 at 10:04 pm
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    Very interesting … and not just what is said about Kasparov, whom I didn’t know much about, but also what Olaf Koens has to say about politics in Russia today. I almost envy the youth of Russia who feel they can afford to ignore politics completely!

    • November 16, 2007 at 2:41 am
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      Ha. Indeed Olaf has some great insight and is always ready to share on my podcast. Hey I think I know alot of youth in the US that still manage to ignore politics.. though admittedly far less this year than say.. 8 years ago.

  • November 19, 2007 at 10:47 pm
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    Russia is oil rich so with prices approaching $100 a barrel, Moscow is awash in cash. Include an insanely low flat tax of 13% on income, combine that with the government and government industry jobs being the big employer in Russia and the huge popularity of Putin, there’s no reason for Russians to give a damn about politics – everything is going well for the educated/political class.

    Remember “taxation without representation” – Will if you don’t have taxation than people aren’t going to be very interested in representation as long as the money and jobs are being provided. See “Saudi Arabia.”

    Your Russian friend said it perfectly – if the metro is on time and people’s cars are running then why bother?

    Have the Russian IRS start to take 40% of the population’s income and watch the people suddenly become interested in politics.

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